Learn More About How Well We Remember Things Through the Power of Our Biological Circadian Rhythms

How much do you know about the old adage, ‘Circadian Rhythm Improves Memory’? If you are not familiar with this saying, then let me tell you. This is actually a real saying and it has actual scientific proof behind it.

In fact, it was discovered that sleep patterns are used by the brain to improve memory retention. When the brain is in deep sleep, certain neurons that are involved in the memory retention process become activated. These neurons need to be revived or else the memory could be lost forever. Researchers believe that these neurons are directly proportional to the brain’s circadian rhythm.

Why don’t you think of how you would feel if you didn’t get a good night’s sleep for a week? You’d probably be spending hours on end thinking and talking about it and thinking that there has to be something you can do about it.

With this in mind, researchers believe that the amount of time that the brain goes into slow-wave sleep determines how much memory the brain retains. Also, the more activity that occurs in the prefrontal cortex during this time, the better chance you have of retaining more of your brain activity.

The study showed that the subjects that were able to get the best memory retention benefited from sleeping for longer durations and waking up at more regular times. It is important to note that getting 8 hours of sleep is ideal and any less than that could prove detrimental to one’s health. Now that you know a little bit more about the back-to-basics back-to-school season, let’s continue our discussion of the back-to-circadian rhythm ace up study.

When the brain enters a state where certain brain wave activity occurs, it sets the clock for the rest of the body to automatically match the brain activity’s brain rhythm with the circadian rhythm of the day. This is a long-lasting effect and can be called the clock’s back-to-circadian rhythms.

The study revealed that saliva secretion can actually cause changes in the brain’s brain wave activity as well. This change can occur whether or not the body has had sufficient sleep the night before. When the brain has already been exposed to changes in the circadian rhythm, the effects of the change will be the same whether the body had adequate rest the night before or not.

This is why those who are exposed to caffeine or other chemicals regularly tend to become overly aware of time, especially when it comes to their own internal clock and the human mind. Not being able to sleep well and perhaps getting up late for work, these individuals tend to be late for work due to their inability to properly fit into their schedule. This is where the study got its name, ‘the back-to-circadian rhythms’.

However, even though this could be a good way to monitor your sleep schedule, you should not go by your internal clock only. It is recommended that you consult a doctor to get a proper medical assessment as to whether or not you are in need of supplemental rest. In most cases, prescription sleep aids are required to maintain the correct circadian rhythm in the human body.

In some cases, it is best to take some vitamins and minerals that will help the body’s natural circadian rhythm to remain consistent, such as magnesium and calcium, which will help your body to hydrate the brain’s fluid levels, which in turn will make it easier for the brain to store information. Those that want to take care of their health will also want to consider eating foods that are rich in antioxidants.

These antioxidants help to lower free radicals in the body. A reduction in free radicals helps to lower the amount of blood glucose in the body, which will aid in balancing the circadian rhythm.

For those looking for a good way to increase their concentration, research a little further and discover more of the information on the Internet. Remember, as soon as you find an appropriate study online, you must always refer to the original source to verify the details.

Learn More About How Well We Remember Things Through the Power of Our Biological Circadian Rhythms
Scroll to top